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PBS Peril & Promise

In Their Element: Water (VIDEO)

Yurok people rely on California’s Klamath River for sustenance, but the dwindling fish population threatens food security. Tribal leaders aim to restore the deteriorated river for future generations. This video was produced in partnership with PBS. Nexus Media News is an editorially independent, nonprofit news service covering climate change. Follow us @NexusMediaNews.READ MORE

PBS Peril & Promise

In Their Element: Fire (VIDEO)

Today California has out-of-control wildfires, but for centuries Indigenous tribes tended the land with fire. One North Fork Mono leader is on a journey to bring back and legalize controlled burns for cultural purposes. This video was produced in partnership with PBS. Nexus Media News is an editorially independent, nonprofit news service covering climate change. Follow us @NexusMediaNewsREAD MORE

PBS Peril & Promise

In Their Element: Air (VIDEO)

With an infrared camera in hand, a Diné (Navajo) community activist investigates methane leaks at oil and gas sites. Environmental protectors sound the alarm and push for regulation in New Mexico’s San Juan Basin. This video was produced in partnership with PBS. Nexus Media News is an editorially independent, nonprofit news service covering climate change. Follow us @NexusMediaNews.READ MORE

PBS Peril & Promise

In Their Element: Earth (VIDEO)

After years of degradation along Louisiana’s bayou, Pointe-au-Chien tribal land is rapidly disappearing. Despite land loss and intensifying storms, community members are determined to stay. Read more here. This video was produced in partnership with PBS. Nexus Media News is an editorially independent, nonprofit news service covering climate change. Follow us @NexusMediaNews.READ MORE

Facebook ad rules

Facebook’s New Ad Policies Make It Harder for Climate Groups to Counter Big Oil

Last month, Facebook removed certain interests from its Detailed Targeting advertising tool “that relate to topics people may perceive as sensitive.” Advertisers can no longer target people based on interests in causes or organizations related to “health, race or ethnicity, political affiliation, religion or sexual orientation.” The change was a response to concerns about online abuse—theREAD MORE

climate migration United States

A Tale of Two Climate Migrants

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.  Climate change is fueling longer dry spells, bigger floods and more violent storms across the globe, but the effect is most pronounced in the tropics, where even a small rise in temperature can turn a heat wave from miserableREAD MORE

lobster fishing climate change

The Lobstermen of the Eastern Yucatán (PHOTOS)

José “Josh” Catzim Castillo, a 25-year-old lobster fisher, circles a hollow concrete box resting on the seafloor, just off the coast of Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. He slips a snare into the box and shakes it. Three spiny lobsters, or langostas, shoot out and try to flee, but Castillo is too quick. He surfaces, hoisting his catch. Its tail snapsREAD MORE

pollution limits coronavirus pandemic

Facing a Health Crisis, Cities Implore Courts to Limit Pollution

The coronavirus is a case study in the limits of federalism. Where the federal government has declined to gather and distribute masks, gloves and ventilators, states and cities have been forced to compete for medical supplies, paying exorbitant prices to secure needed equipment. Where the federal government has been slow to ramp up testing, states andREAD MORE

A 2017 rally against shipments of fracked natural gas in Kalama, Washington. Source: Rick Rappaport

The Making of the ‘Thin Green Line’

This story is published as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. One afternoon in 2012, members of the Lummi Nation called a public gathering on the beach at Cherry Point, near their Bellingham, Washington reservation. They met at the site where SSA Marine was planning to buildREAD MORE

this-man-wants-to-make-you-a-tower-climbing-grease-monkey-video

This Man Wants to Make You a Tower Climbing Grease Monkey

Thanks to the coronavirus, we are rapidly heading toward a recession. Lawmakers are scrambling for ways to keep the economy aloft — distributing relief payments, bolstering unemployment, bailing out out hard-hit industries. But these measures are likely to prove insufficient, which is why some observers are pushing for a clean-energy jobs program to revive the economy and restoreREAD MORE

Girls in class. Source: Pexels

Want to Stop Climate Change? Educate Girls.

Greta Thunberg, who famously missed school to protest climate change, recently met Malala Yousafzai, who won the Nobel Peace Prize fighting to make sure girls could get an education. The photo op quickly went viral. Quipped Yousafzai, “She’s the only friend I’d skip school for.” Behind the banter was a telling truth — the battle to stem climateREAD MORE

fracking texas

Fossil Fuel Drilling Is Making Texans Sick (VIDEO)

Methane released from fracking is terrible for the climate. In Texas, it’s also hurting people’s health. In the summer of 2018, Nexus Media took part in Freedom to Breathe, a cross-country tour that explored how climate change intersects with the racial, social and economic challenges that Americans face every day. We saw firsthand how fossil fuel pollutionREAD MORE

Migrant farm workers in field

Extreme Heat Threatens Farms and Farm Workers (VIDEO)

In the summer of 2018, Nexus Media took part in Freedom to Breathe, a cross-country tour that explored how climate change intersects with the racial, social and economic challenges that Americans face every day. We saw firsthand how fossil fuel pollution and extreme weather are damaging communities across the United States, and how ordinary people areREAD MORE

Port Arthur, Texas. Source: Nexus Media

Fighting Floods and Fossil Fuels in Port Arthur, Texas (VIDEO)

In the summer of 2018, Nexus Media took part in Freedom to Breathe, a cross-country tour that explored how climate change intersects with the racial, social and economic challenges that Americans face every day. We saw firsthand how fossil fuel pollution and extreme weather are damaging communities across the United States, and how ordinary people areREAD MORE

climate change gentrification

Where Rising Seas Are Raising Rents (VIDEO)

In the summer of 2018, Nexus Media took part in Freedom to Breathe, a cross-country tour that explored how climate change intersects with the racial, social and economic challenges that Americans face every day. We saw firsthand how fossil fuel pollution and extreme weather are damaging communities across the United States, and how ordinary people areREAD MORE

politics green new deal

The Politics of a Green New Deal (VIDEO)

In the summer of 2018, Nexus Media took part in Freedom to Breathe, a cross-country tour that explored how climate change intersects with the racial, social and economic challenges that Americans face every day. We saw firsthand how fossil fuel pollution and extreme weather are damaging communities across the United States, and how ordinary people areREAD MORE

climate change organic farming

At UN Climate Conference U.S. Growers Defend Large-Scale Farming

For the first time ever, the UN is building out a roadmap for curbing carbon pollution from agriculture. To take part in that process, a coalition of U.S. farmers traveled to the UN climate conference in Madrid, Spain this month to make the case for the role that large-scale farming operations, long criticized for their outsizedREAD MORE

A new study finds heat and humidity can aggravate the symptoms of lupus. Source: Pixabay

Worsening Weather Could Make Life Miserable for Lupus Patients

Rheumatologist George Stojan says that many of his lupus patients know their joints are going to swell or go stiff when the weather shifts, particularly when the temperature or humidity changes. It got him thinking about how climate change could exacerbate their disease, and prompted him to take a closer look at the possible connection. Stojan,READ MORE

Former EPA administrator Gina McCarthy. Source: EPA

Obama’s EPA Chief: ‘Sometimes You Need to Listen to the Kids’

As EPA administrator under former president Barack Obama, Gina McCarthy crafted a slate of ambitious policies to curb planet-warming carbon pollution. But since Trump took office, she has seen much of her work undone. McCarthy may be discouraged, but she is not defeated. She recently spoke to Nexus Media about environmental inequality, government corruption, and howREAD MORE

Xiye Bastida (second from right) and climate change youth leaders outside the United Nations. Source: Photo by Felix Kunze

Meet Kick-Ass Teen Climate Activist Xiye Bastida

Xiye Bastida grew up in the Mexican town of San Pedro Tultepec embracing the Otomi indigenous belief that if you take care of the Earth, it will take care of you. “Earth is our home,” she said. “It gives you air, water and shelter. Everything we need. All it asks is that we protect it.” NearlyREAD MORE

A miner holds a piece of coal. Source: Peabody Energy

As the Coal Industry Falls Apart, Miners Face Losing Their Pensions

In June, the Trump administration unveiled one of its largest environmental rollbacks to date: replacing the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan rule, which regulated carbon pollution from power plants. The rule had been a favorite target of President Trump as he stumped on the campaign trail and held presidential rallies. “We’ve ended the war on beautiful,READ MORE

An Extinction Rebellion protest on Blackfriars Bridge in London, November 17, 2018. Source: Julia Hawkins

The Radical Philosophy of Extinction Rebellion

New York police recently arrested 66 protestors who rallied outside The New York Times building to compel the newspaper to make climate change a front-page issue. The demonstrators belonged to Extinction Rebellion, a movement born in the United Kingdom that is committed to nonviolent resistance. In addition to protesting outside of The New York Times, U.S.READ MORE

Mosquito on skin. Source: Pixabay

New Research Shows Malaria Can Spread In Cooler Climates

For nearly a century, scientists thought that malaria could only spread in places where it is really hot. That’s because malaria is spread by a tiny parasite that infects mosquitoes, which then infect humans — and this parasite loves warm weather. In warmer climates, the parasite grows quickly inside the mosquito’s body. But in cooler climates, the parasiteREAD MORE

GE's Investment Mistake

GE’s Investment Mistake Could Cost Billions

Last week, General Electric announced it would close a California gas plant 20 years ahead of schedule. The Inland Empire Energy Center in California, the company said, was “uneconomical to support further” in part because of outdated technology. But California’s aggressive clean energy goals and commitment to using renewable energy was also a key determinant in GE’sREAD MORE

Fighting Sea Level Rise

The Dutch Are Building a Barricade Against Climate Change (PHOTOS)

The inhabitants of the Netherlands have been fighting floods for thousands of years. Eight-hundred years ago, they began to create local councils called “waterschappen” that were tasked with preventing floods. The rich provided the money and the poor provided their labor to build and maintain levees. Those councils still exist today, and they have a newREAD MORE

Fossil Fuel Protests - Nexus Media News

Fossil Fuel Protesters Push a Coal Plant to Become a Solar-Powered Data Center

Lisa Marshall isn’t your typical activist. For one thing, she’s not into crowds and didn't originally see herself among the legion of fossil fuel protesters. “I don’t really like rallies,” Marshall, a mom of three from upstate New York, said. “They’re a little stressful — not my favorite thing.” Marshall, who has two degrees in earth science, remembersREAD MORE

invisible-heroes-of-the-sea-photos

Invisible Heroes of the Sea (PHOTOS)

For nearly two centuries, scientists have pondered “Darwin’s Paradox,” the enduring mystery of why coral reefs thrive in tropical waters, which are woefully short on nutrients. Reefs are teeming oases in aquatic wastelands, and researchers have puzzled endlessly over how they flourish. One answer may come from the thousands of species of tiny colorful fish, rarelyREAD MORE